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that was the first person who ever did, a first mother who ever did, yes. >> why didn't the eleanor-sara relationship work? >> sara could not give up her dominance, and eleanor came into the relationship feeling quite inferior. she had a terrible childhood, terrible. and she was glad enough at the beginning to let this mother-in-law do all sorts of things for her. but then as time went on, she never began to take over her own life. they lived their entire life in sara delano roosevelt's house at hyden park, or the house of the city that the mother-in-law built for them. but she built an adjacent house for herself with connecting doors. so it was an absolutely dominant kind of relationship. and i would say i fought franklin roosevelt for turning a blind eye to this very uncomfortable situation for his wife and not insisting on having a house of their own where she could have their children and be a family. the children really were closer to their grandmother than the mother. >> we heard for years the story about mrs. roosevelt moving to harvard to live near her son. >> yes. >> what did you find out ab
, republicans might go for this but democrats won't. >> eleanor? >> it is not a radical budget actually, it is a reasonable budget. the tax increases he is calling for are capping deductions and closing loopholes, which is what mitt romney ran on and what republicans have supported in the past. so this is well within the bounds of negotiations that have already gone on. secondly, it is unprecedented for a democratic president to lead the charge on trimming entitlements, and yes he is getting push back from his party. the reason the president put that out there is to see if the republicans can say yes to anything. they have demanded this chain cpi, they have demanded he aggressively go after entitlements, and now they are sitting back and are not so sure they want to say yes to anything. so what the president is doing is looking for a third column with republicans outside of the leadership. he has dinner with the dozen, he has had some success on other issues. peeling off republicans on guns, peeling them off on immigration and creating this column of republicans that he can work with in
. >> but the establishment of a palestinian state? >> ultimately that was a hugely controversial issue eleanor roosevelt who was not much of an advocate for jewish issues during the war becomes a major advocate after but the state department threatens to resign if chairman supports the state of israel ultimately he does come out to support the state of israel and immediately recognizes the state of israel and becomes a hero even though earlier he was criticized to be anti-semitic. i think fdr would have done the same thing he was strong on the establishment of palestine when he was governor he issued a statement saying he supported a jewish homeland in palestine he opposed those with innovation policy and constantly tried go back channels to pressure the british to modify the white paper and spoke out in favor of a jewish homeland at the end of his life, he is gravely ill and traveled to the suez canal to meet with the king of saudi arabia to persuade him to except the jewish state in palestine to offer incentives and got absolutely no where for that and was gravely ill so much he was operating on there of
'll be joined by eleanor sneal, head of the the feminist majority, great show coming up but first. >> this is the full court press. >> other headlines making news on this monday march madness, now april madness comes to an end tonight as the ncaa back of basketball tournament championship after four games on saturday, where louisville beat out wichita state by four points. michigan beat syracuse by 5. number 1 louisville against number 4 michigan the last time these two teams played each other was back in 1978. >> who won? >> i don't know it's been so long ago. >> bill: i saw a little bit of that louisville-wich game. i was starting to worry. >> umh-huh. >>wich was looking good. what's that mean for tonight? >> michigan is hot at the right time. louisville has had a couple -- they have had a good tournament so far but the fact that they struggled a little bit in that last game, i don't know. may get steamrolled. >> four n.f.l. players may come out of the closet sooner we think. that's what form ter baltimore ravens tells "the sun," there are up to
's really up to because they're not there. >> let's wrap it up, eleanor. exit question. on a military readiness scale, def con 5. >> it means a very low level. >> what does or something like. that we raised it in the nixon white house. >> okay, def con 5 meaning normal peace time conditions. derkz f con 1 meaning u.s. forces on maximum alert. how high will this crisis reach before it is resolved? >> i don't think it's a nuclear crisis so i don't think you ought to raise the def con at all. i hope it's resolved. >> i'll go along with all that. that certainly is a big come- down from all your doomsday talk of about two minutes, a isn't it? >> look, he can't back down. i think -- if does he something, key start a war. >> he can back down. his father and grandfather backed down. >> they didn't back down at all. >> this is a very familiar script. >> former hawk. >> you really want a war? >> i don't want a war. >> you're raising the def con. >> what do you think? >> listen, i don't think that we can expect anything from kim jong-un at this stage of the game. >> def con 4? >> i think it will
in contrast to the beauty of the mountains. this bed-and-breakfast is led by eleanor, who has seen people cashing in by leasing their land. >> you are happy for your neighbor, but their good fortune ruin the hills,ano and the trees. >> it is time to spend a pay check from drilling for gas. >> once we get the pipeline done it is going to boost the economy. there is nothing here. >> it has brought more with the businesses and the people who rent have done very well. >> what has happened shows house tracking has the potential -- shows how frakking has the potential to reduce dependency on foreign oil just across the delaware river who lies new york, where prospects are f ew. it contains gas, a potential gold mine, but in new york there has been a moratorium on frakking as officials review how it could affect the environment. they say it will create pollution and ruin the tranquil atmosphere. >> environmental impacts are huge. you have air pollution, water pollution, a greenhouse gas. when we say environmental impact, these are public health impact. lived nearhas hancock for over 100 years. h
-down measure, i think we're beginning to see a shift. >> before we talk about the measure itself. eleanor cliff said the gun safety lobby is here to stay. we talk about the power of the nra, eleanor cliff said the newtown families and gabrielle giffords are in the gun safety lobby to say. the culture of guns is beginning to go through a transformation in in this country. >> i think it will be make it easier to pass, sensible gun legislation going forward. it's a disgrace that we may not get a vote on anything in the house. it's an absolute disgrace. but they will pay for it. republicans who are elected from moderate congressional districts, still about 80 or 90 of them if boehner decides not to bring it to the floor, we're going to circulate a discharge petition. if they don't sign the discharge petrion, they will pay for it at the polls in 2014. because they think that there's no emotion on our side? well, come to suburban philadelphia and talk to women in suburban philadelphia. the emotion is at a fever pitch and they will pay for it. and it's stunning to me, the arguments are so disingenuous
for the first time. finish ahead of eleanor vandyke. is begun, butson not in the usual way. he was involved in a 150 meter race. 14performed the sprint in 10 oh 1wo seconds, 7/ short of his own record. >> thank you. political violence in bangladesh -- a impact on the farmers not named for security reasons. >> he worked all year for this crop in bangladesh, but most of it has gone to waste. political unrest has caused violence and reaches across the countryside. , most protest strikes people stay at home because bombings are common. their precious products do not make it to the market. , butey are supposed to go if you go on the road they might destroy it. the vehicle costs over $25,000. >> they do not have expensive cold storage facilities. if they cannot get their products to the market they use everything. he is trying to use what is left of his potato crop. after weeks of protests he says other crops have already been wasted. , itecause of the hassles will take 10 years to cover these losses. --caught between pain paying interest on loans and paying workers. those who work the land alway
because you scream, as eleanor said, about the problem then the one who comes in behind you or the ones who come in mind you then sit down and try to change the culture. >> that's absolutely right. when you're trying having to a social change movement, it's like biodiversity, all of the above. different roles they can play but the bottom lin you shouldn't closeown any oft, lett a move on forward and the people behind can do the ground work, the tactical work to make things move forward. but the folks in the front doing the screaming are helping the movement. >> i agree that people's minds may be changed differently but i think you're much more likely to change my mind by sitting down, having a reasonable conversation instead of what could be offensive, in-your-face tactics. changing the hearts and minds of the people will happen by showing up at their place of worship, burning your flag or baring your breast. >> notice what we're talking about, ukrainian women. they come from different cultures the way who are americans and europeans do and i'm not -- not just happening in the middle of
as a friend of bill, we will be joined in the studio by congress woman eleanor homes norton from the district of columbia. president obama kind of a kickback schedule today for the most part. he and the vice president will receive their presidential daily briefing. at 10:15. after that, the president will take off down constitution avenue, the national academy of sciences, the 150th anniversary. whoa of the national academy of sciences, and ter celebrating down there. the president will deliver remarks at their celebration. jay carney holding his daily briefing to the at 12:30. i will be there for all of you and tell you all about it. >> this is "the bill press show." s zros >> bill: press . >> hey, good morning everybody. welcome to the "full-court press" this monday april 29th. good to see you today. thank you for joining us as we come to you live coast to coast from our studio right here on capitol hill. kind of quiet the house and senate are out of town. there is a lot going on. a lot they did before town we want to talk about. for example,
was her maiden name. unlike hillary clinton or eleanor roosevelt, it wasn't a husband who promoted her. she was working class. lived above a grocery store. really made her own way into things. and even the iron lady, i mean, originally the task network and the soviet union used it as a criticism of her and mocked her. she embraced that iron lady motif. yet she always had the learned manners of the british aristocracy. reagan would always let her walk in front as a proper lady. and that word, lady, she took very seriously, yet she was a hawk on the cold war and was suspicious of the european integration movement, particularly the euro, was more about the special alliance. i think -- with the u.s. i think there is, like you said, chris, churchill and fdr, and then there's thatcher and reagan. she embodies what the special relationship's all about. >> the great thing about churchill, and i'm a churchill buff, or nut even, was he knew he had to fight the nazis. there was no talking to these guys. they had to be beaten. i watched "winds of war" the other night again. the guy says the only t
, immediately i filed suit against turtles. not amphibians, the rock group. eleanor gee i think i'm swell frightens me. so i have got a shot here in new york, do you know what i'm talking about? >> once again, i blame the germans for driving this creep's family out of italy. i wish he would have stayed over there. listen, we have got to start shunning morons like this. the only people who hang with them are frogs. all right? >> bill: got to give him credit. he and his lawyers got one sixth because frogs came on his property. >> billy, i can't laugh anymore this country is gone. we are screwed up we should shun this i had i don't yacht. you know something? one of these countries out there. if greece wants to get flush again, they should change the name of their country to common senseyvania i'm afraid of rocks somebody breaks his nods and says get out of here. now you are afraid of me and not the frog. set up neighborhoods that remind us you have the united states town or france town or spanish town. somebody ought to beat somebody else to the punch. common senseyvania the rest of the worl
. and this is a movement that einstein, eleanor roosevelt, henry wallace, a lot were involved in, and fromm is too. only unlike many of the others, fromm can shower out millions of dollars to support the one world movement. so this is fromm, these are, i think, his major contributions. and maybe you have 10 or 12 questions. [laughter] [applause] >> do we have, and if we don't have such intellectuals now -- but i'm not sure, maybe we do -- do we have that kind of respect for the intellectual now? we could send somebody to iran and talk to them about their nuclear policies and overcome these obstacles. or do we not have people like that anymore? >> is that supposed to be an easy question? [laughter] well, we run across the street an annual conference on elected officials to try to figure out what it is. you can, obviously, in this town and chomsky is obvious, robert lipton's obvious, but beyond that it's hard. there's a historian wrote a book called "the last intellectual," and the theme was that act deem was crushing it out, was preventing it, that academia is not a place for public intellectuals, rather
administration. the democratic members of congress that are included in this are mark begich, eleanor holmes norton and also tammy duckworth. what does your gut tell you about this? do you think it will spur more members of congress to give up a portion of their pay? to go facebook.com/newsnation to vote there. >>> we'll have an update on yesterday's gut check. new jersey lawmakers planning to investigate why rutgers didn't firemen's basketball coach mike rice earlier in a group of faculty members is calling on the state university of the members to resign. rice was fired yesterday after videotape surfaced that showed him roughing up players during practice using anti-gay slurs. but the video was given last november to the athletic director who fine asked us is penned the coach and sent him to anger management classes. we asked you, do you think that the athletic director should also be fired? 93% of you said yes. 7% of you said no. >>> that will do it for this edition of "news nation." thank you for being here. i'm thomas roberts in for tom ir. don't go anywhere. "the cycle" comes your way
and dozen became 46. and those 46 women hired the future congressional delegate eleanor holmes norton as their attorney. and they became the first women in the media to sue for employment discrimination under title 7 of the civil rights act. they sued and they won. but their story, like so many others, quickly faded away into the history books. that was until 2010 when three young women also working at newsweek rediscovered it while they were writing a piece on fairness in the workplace, rediscovered it. and as they read the account of the women who came before them who worked so hard for so little credit, they saw how much had changed since the days when women in the newsroom were actually called news dollies. but they also saw how much hadn't changed. they talked to their colleagues and they heard similar frustrations echoing decades later. men had written all but six of the previous year cover stories. and more women had joined the ranks of the magazines mast head but only 39% of the leadership positions. and here's the thing, because we are supposed to be living in a society where
a national shame. first lady eleanor roosevelt resigned from the daughters of the revolution in protest. and led the cause for a new concert. that concert was moved outside to the lincoln memorial. it was april 9th, 1939. easter sunday. 75,000 people, black and white, came to watch. ♪ my country 'tis of thee sweet land of liberty of thee i sing ♪ >> ma -- millions of other americans listened on the radio. and with that historic performance, anderson became a civil rights icon. 24 years later, she sang at the lincoln memorial again. when dr. martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech. and her spirit was there in 2009 when barack obama went to lincoln memorial to celebrate his election as the nation's first black president. ma marian anderson gave vote to a call for justice and the awakening of a civil rights movement. e
. she quickly took to it. >> and robert, how old were you when liz's grandmother, eleanor, kraus and her husband, gale, selected you to come to america? >> almost 11. my sister, who was in the same group, was 13. >> and how were you approached? how did your family discuss with you, here's what's about to happen? how did this news come to you at the age of 11? >> well be, i was quite excited. because i recall i wasn't sad at all because in earlier years, as a 10-year-old, i was fascinated by books written who wrote german fantasy novels for young boys about the wild west, indians and buffaloes and mountain trappers. i was quite carried away with that. my father explained i would be going to america and they'd eventually join us. my parents couldn't join us. me parents were unable to get a visa to emigrate the united states. they survived the war in vienna. with difficulty. >> did you ever get to see your parents again? >> exactly -- let's see. we left in 1938. was it '38? yeah. i saw them again in 147. >> putting this project together, reading the journal, so many children would not be re
? mary, ael is hostile to certainly amassed a great deal of evidence to support his view. eleanor and franklin people, and they are pretty much abraham and married people. there are people that will not set on the same stage at scholarly symposiums. they are so committed to one or the other and how passionate these historians feel. >> abraham seemed committed to marry. >> and that is the ultimate test, in some ways. if he has read catherine clinton's biography of mrs. lincoln where she engages him. at thee to really look reasons why people write biographies or books. he was angry. and later took it out on mary. you have i have heard, to look at the motives behind the books. >> i asked what you thought of the modern portrayal. >> it was wonderful precisely because it transcends all of these camps. >> i agree. from mary lincoln about her own view at the public perception, i seem to be the scapegoat for both the north and the south. we will show you next, another video. a woman at her summer cottage not very far from the capital to call the soldiers home. >> president lincoln's cotta
like turds. "no one can make you look like a turd without your permission." eleanor roosevelt. ha! this kid's a trip! funny stuff, funny stuff. you know what? i'm actually, uh... i'm starving. you hungry, ron-ton? you mean eat one of bob's burgers? hugo would never... oh, come on, ron. this guy... (laughs) how tall is this guy? (chuckling): he's pretty tall. the leaning tower of ta... of tall guy. (bob laughs) i'm giving you a hard time, come here. hey, bob, can you grill us up a couple? um... is this part of the inspection? uh, yeah, something i like to call the mouth inspection. (laughing) okay. (continues laughing) whoa! this is incredible! wow, first time i ever got a compliment from a health inspector. bob, question: you like rock? um, yeah. i like rock... music. is that what you're talking about? yes. okay. you know, i play almost every night over at pistol mcswish's basketball and brew. you should come by. th-that'd be great. absolutely. what your burger did to my mouth, my music is gonna do to your ears. (laughs) that's great... (laughs) come here, come here. all right, al
of freedom and democracy and is a stalwart of human rights. eleanor roosevelt helped put together the declaration of human rights. that is a great source of inspiration for people around the world, especially human rights. i also believe from my travels that there's something else. that is that we are all alike, all the same. whether you're a mother or father or a mother or father in kenya or ethiopia or asia or latin america, we all care about our kids. we all care about our families. we all care about our security. i believe even know we are doing great things, i want to give brasov credit for this see the future they may have to promote agricultural growth and food security over the world. we have to invest much much more in that. if we had known around the world as a leader in the effort to end extreme poverty and hunger, people would like us more. i have this radical idea of people healthier, they don't want charity. i'm the author george mcgovern robert dole food for education program, basically the school lunch program that has incentives to create sustainable self-sufficie
. >> wrong. >> stephanie: exactly. you are wronger than eleanor clift. >> that's hard to do. >> stephanie: eleanor clift. she must have her own version of ptsd. she hears the word wrong. wrong! >> stephanie: okay. yes, is this gawker? it really is kind of hilarious. i'm sorry, huff post did a thing about how popular background checks are because the president joked last week, how often do 90% of americans agree on anything? he said he was saying nine in ten, that's about 90%. agree that somebody purchasing a firearm needs a background check. here are the fun facts "huffington post" set out. ice cream one thing, ice cream garnered more approval than background checks. more americans it turns out support universal background checks than like apple pie. baseball. kittens. and child labor laws. how about that. only 81% have a favorable rating of apple pie. we're becoming a country of communists. >> apple pie not my favorite. >> stephanie: me neither. >> wow! i don't know you anymore! >> stephanie: i've betrayed you, america. clearly, that's why i hate america. i adopt like apple pie. blueberr
been born at a different age, would she have been like eleanor roosevelt? >> that is hard to do. she certainly would, she had all the attributes of a very dynamic woman who was opinionated and would have had her own goals to pursue. she would have been very influential. she was very influential in the presidency. >> a lot of historians -- there have been a four surveys of historians over the past decades -- abigail adams always comes in the number two or number three position as most influential. why? >> who would be number one? >> eleanor roosevelt, i think. why does she end up in the number two spot? >> there is a distant in time. people have other images. people that knew -- people are still alive and that no eleanor roosevelt. she is modern. if you did a survey now, jacqueline kennedy would probably rate much higher because people know and like her at that time. the only thing we have from abigail are the letters. >> and she is still in the number two spot. not bad. she seemed to route this to hundred years being the second most influential first ladies based on the letters you h
the recipient of the eleanor roosevelt award and second amendment foundation. she refers book called god, the gunman, and me. needless to say, her experience brazen incredibly personal perspective to the issue of firearms policy. please help me welcome our panelists today. [applause] mary katherine ham, qaeda we start with you? >> hello. it is a pleasure to be here. i am a sucker for colorado. anytime you guys need me, just holler. i love it here. and it is a pleasure to be on this panel with folks who frankly know a lot more about this issue that i do, and especially over here, the bonafide hero. is exciting to be here with you guys as well. the toughest fire i go up against. just kidding. last week i did get into a fiery debate. it is actually about as close as i get to biting someone set up on tv because the implied, of course, and you will recognize the strategy, somewhat disappointing to me because there actually friends in real life, he implied that i did not care about victims of gun violence because i happen to believe the second amendment is useful and coming you know, part of t
george for the owner of the train, george pullman. and you know the famous story of eleanor roosevelt taking a. phillip randolph to meet with fdr, and he describes the condition of black people many this country to president fdr, roosevelt. he describes the condition of working people in this country, and fdr listens intelligently and then responds, i don't disagree with anything you've said, but you'll have to make me do it. and interestingly, when barack obama was running for president the first time, he was in the backyard of a new jersey home, about 100 people there to see him, and he was taking questions. and a man at the back raised his hand and said what are you going to do about the middle east? he repeated the story of a. phillip randolph and fdr and fdr saying to a. phillip randolph, make me do it. that's interesting for anyone in this country to be a responsible citizen. you have to make your demands known. but rosa parks knew just what she was doing. she was an activist. she trained at the highlander center in tennessee. king had been there. black and white together learni
. we will pay for our sins to the person we commit them against. host: that is eleanor from memphis, tennessee. the president and vice president had their tax forms a released yesterday. republican line caller:, good: i want to begin with the tax we had some years ago. i can't remember what it was called but cigarette taxes were raised to pay for children's medical care. do you remember? host: i don't but go ahead with your thoughts. caller: that was all it was for was to pay for a children's medical program. there were not enough smokers. there are not enough smokers that did not pay for it and they put it in with everything else. smoking did not pay for it at all. host: you are saying a cigarette tax won't work? caller: yes, and something else -- i have been a social worker most of my life. with children. for the state of arkansas. i have found with families that i served that this headstart program was used for a babysitter and people were just -- they had nothing good to say. they did not keep the children all day. host: a recent magazine had a post on their website on this prop
pullman why they need to organize in the famous story of eleanor roosevelt taking randolph to meet with fdr and he describes the condition of black people to the president fdr and the condition of working people and fdr response i don't disagree with anything you have said the will have to make me do it. interestingly when barack obama was running for president, the first time time, he was in the backyard of a new jersey home with 100 people and taking questions and a man said what you going to do about the middle east? he repeated the story of a philip randolph and fdr and he said make me do it. that's interesting for anyone in this country to be responsible citizen. you have to make your demands known. but rosa parks knew just what she was doing. she was an activist and trained at the highlander center in tennessee. black and white together learning to effectively strategizing to change the law. the media denigrates activists but what could be more noble to dedicate your life to be a better place and to show how brave she was just go back a few months to the summer of 55 to the k
to mary, certainly amassed a great deal of evidence to support his view. eleanor and franklin people, and they are pretty much abraham and -- mary people. there are people that will not set on the same stage at scholarly symposiums. they are so committed to one or the other and how passionate these historians feel. >> abraham seemed committed to mary. >> and that is the ultimate test, in some ways. >> i wonder if he has read catherine clinton's biography of mrs. lincoln where she engages him. you have to really look at the reasons why people write biographies or books. he was angry. and later took it out on mary. from what i have heard, you have to look at the motives behind the books. >> he asked what you thought of the modern portrayal. >> it was wonderful precisely because it transcends all of these camps. >> i agree. from mary lincoln about her own view at the public perception, i seem to be the scapegoat for both the north and the south. we will show you next, another video. a woman at her summer cottage not very far from the capital to call the soldiers home. >> president linco
amassed a great deal of evidence to support his view. eleanor and franklin people, and they are pretty much abraham and married people. there are people that will not set on the same stage at scholarly symposiums. they are so committed to one or the other and how passionate these historians feel. >> abraham seemed committed to marry. >> and that is the ultimate test, in some ways. >> i wonder if he has read catherine clinton's biography mrs. lincoln where she engages him. thehave to really look at reasons why people write biographies or books. he was angry. and later took it out on mary. from what i have heard, you have to look at the motives behind the books. >> i asked what you thought of the modern portrayal. >> it was wonderful precisely because it transcends all of these camps. >> i agree. from mary lincoln about her own view at the public perception, forem to be the scapegoat both the north and the south. we will show you next, another video. a woman at her summer cottage not very far from the capital to call the soldiers home. >> president lincoln's cottage was a seasonal home f
and as a stalwart of human rights. eleanor roosevelt helped put together the universal declaration of human rights. that's a great source of inspiration for people around the world especially human rights defenders. i also believe from my travels that there's something else and that is we're all alike, we are all the same. whether you're a mother or father, here in washington or in massachusetts, or whether you're a mother or father in kenya or ethiopia or a country in asia or latin america, we all have one thing in common. we all care about our kids. .. give you one example. i am the author of this program called the george mcgovern bold program to cover school lunch program that has all kinds of incentives to help create a kind of sustainable self-sufficient school feeding programs in various parts of the world. many of the kids right now are being fed in school because of this program. millions of girls who otherwise wouldn't go to school is going to school because there is a meal. their parents are sending them. these programs are innovative where you go for a school meal, have your class and
. >> brett is here. >> uh-oh. who else? >> eleanor? >> i can handle her. apgar her in my pocket. -- i've got her in my pocket. who else? bobnovack are and at one table. >> your sears the killing my bus. -- you are seriously killing my buzz. other secretany achievements we should know about? >> last week and nearly averted a tennis strike. >> i never heard about that. >> laying low. playing it cool. book doesmcnamara's cannot sing vietnam was a mistake. your war record is no longer an issue. >> i am vindicated. it was a bad war and i chose not to serve. it was the right thing to do. except i chose to go to russia and party with communists. it was the right thing to do. rooftop of thehe kremlin and got high with a very high willie nelson. >> elections are coming up. you had some big victories like nafta. >> that is right. i came up with a slogan. aftah'or nafta, party we're only beginning to see the effects of nafta. it will make mexican food more accessible to the united states, and foreign foods like burritos, enchiladas, cannoli. >> i am sorry? the crime bill was a very important achievemen
46 women hired a future congressional delegate, eleanor holmes norton as their attorney. and he became the first women in the media to seal for employment discrimination under title vii of the civil rights act. they sued and they one. but their story, like so many others quickly faded away into the history books. that was until 2010, when three young women also working at "newsweek" w rediscovered it whe they were writing a piece on fairness in the workplace. rediscovered it. and as the ready count of the women who came before them, who worked so hard for so little credit, they saw how much had changed. since the days when women in the newsroom were actually called news dollies. but i also saw how much had changed. they talked to their colleagues and their similar frustrations echo in decades later. men had written all but six of the previous year cover stories. and more women have joined the ranks of the magazines masses, but still only 39% of the leadership positions. and here's the thing, because we are supposed to be living in a society where these battles have been fought a
series that will be broadcast in the fall on eleanor roosevelt believe it or not, is it -- it put together an intimate history of the social and military stores records show, but about the scholarship within their inner lives and their relationships there are the family that has influenced other families more than any other in american history and during a film about dyslexic kids and boys that are * -- to memorize and recite the gettysburg address. we have a jackie robinson film that we are working on. we have just about opened the editing room from the massive series on the history of vietnam. and our civil war series of 1990. ad we are just beginning series on the history of country music called "i can't stop loving you." we will be able to get there. park 5 will air on pbs on tuesday. person writes in and says that nyc need an independent since and panel that can look into any police incidents the results in death. and another person writes that no one seems to care about the victims' rights to see the actual perpetrator prosecutor and convicted. not a standing in. >> -- guest
at a government ceremony in washington because of the color of her skin. when first lady eleanor roosevelt found out about the snub, she personally invited anderson to perform at an easter concert at the lincoln memorial. ♪ >> reporter: anderson sang before a crowd of 75,000 people. 24 years later, dr. king chose that exact spot for his famous speech. >> so when you're looking at that spot, where it says, i have a dream, manage how much history is there. >> reporter: it is at this moment that history comes alive for zenzalai. >> where is it? where is it? and she fights through the crowds to find the spot. >> she sang right where martin luther king had his "i have a dream" speech. >> reporter: zenzalai's parents stretched their budget to pay for her trip, but they believe the experience was priceless. >> i'm glad that she was able the to hear that story, i'm glad that she was able to even be at the mall where dr. martin luther king gave that speech. i don't think she really feels any kind of limitations. i think she really feels like whatever she desires in life, she deserves and can have. >> a
of children and their families. you must be gabrielle's dad. i'm eleanor. good to meet you. hendrick: there's an old adage, "when we support the family, we support the child." but the opposite is true, too. when we ignore the family, we ignore a vital part of knowing the child. the key, of course, is communication, and it's never too early to start. ...keep her out of school. she's doing great. she really likes it. i think it's important to know where a child comes from because each child comes from a different background, and that's one of the reasons that we do home visits, is to meet and talk to the family in their own environment. i feel that when we come back from a home visit, which is usually done in the beginning of the year for the first time, i'm able to understand the parent and the child better. hendrick: many of us, especially those who work with infants, are the child's and the parents' first real contact with the outside world. this presents us with a unique opportunity for becoming closely involved and attached to our infants and family members. hi. hi. but how do we form a
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